Explain the relationship between atticus and scout

In to kill a mockingbird what are relationship traits between atticus and scout? | Yahoo Answers

explain the relationship between atticus and scout

Members of the family included Atticus, Jem, Scout, Aunt Alexandra, and Calpurnia. book shows many different sides to the relationship between Atticus and Jem. `No I just want to explain to you that-your Aunt Alexandra asked me son. Get an answer for 'What kind of relationship does Scout have with Atticus in To In To Kill a Mockingbird, what is the relationship between Scout and Atticus?. Told through the eyes of Scout Finch, you learn about her father Atticus Finch, He has no problem with his children attending Calpurnia's church, or with a.

At both colleges, she wrote short stories and other works about racial injustice, a rarely mentioned topic on such campuses at the time. Hoping to be published, Lee presented her writing in to a literary agent recommended by Capote.

An editor at J. Lippincottwho bought the manuscript, advised her to quit the airline and concentrate on writing. Donations from friends allowed her to write uninterruptedly for a year. Hohoff was impressed, "[T]he spark of the true writer flashed in every line," she would later recount in a corporate history of Lippincott, [6] but as Hohoff saw it, the manuscript was by no means fit for publication.

It was, as she described it, "more a series of anecdotes than a fully conceived novel.

explain the relationship between atticus and scout

The book was published on July 11, I was hoping for a quick and merciful death at the hands of the reviewers but, at the same time, I sort of hoped someone would like it enough to give me encouragement. I hoped for a little, as I said, but I got rather a whole lot, and in some ways this was just about as frightening as the quick, merciful death I'd expected.

To Kill a Mockingbird

List of To Kill a Mockingbird characters The story takes place during three years —35 of the Great Depression in the fictional "tired old town" of Maycomb, Alabama, the seat of Maycomb County. It focuses on six-year-old Jean Louise Finch nicknamed Scoutwho lives with her older brother, Jeremy nicknamed Jemand their widowed father, Atticus, a middle-aged lawyer.

Jem and Scout befriend a boy named Dill, who visits Maycomb to stay with his aunt each summer. The three children are terrified yet fascinated by their neighbor, the reclusive Arthur "Boo" Radley.

The adults of Maycomb are hesitant to talk about Boo, and few of them have seen him for many years. The children feed one another's imagination with rumors about his appearance and reasons for remaining hidden, and they fantasize about how to get him out of his house.

After two summers of friendship with Dill, Scout and Jem find that someone leaves them small gifts in a tree outside the Radley place. Several times the mysterious Boo makes gestures of affection to the children, but, to their disappointment, he never appears in person. Judge Taylor appoints Atticus to defend Tom Robinson, a black man who has been accused of raping a young white woman, Mayella Ewell.

Although many of Maycomb's citizens disapprove, Atticus agrees to defend Tom to the best of his ability. Other children taunt Jem and Scout for Atticus's actions, calling him a " nigger -lover".

Scout is tempted to stand up for her father's honor by fighting, even though he has told her not to. Atticus faces a group of men intent on lynching Tom.

explain the relationship between atticus and scout

This danger is averted when Scout, Jem, and Dill shame the mob into dispersing by forcing them to view the situation from Atticus' and Tom's perspective. Atticus does not want Jem and Scout to be present at Tom Robinson's trial. No seat is available on the main floor, so by invitation of the Rev. Sykes, Jem, Scout, and Dill watch from the colored balcony. Atticus establishes that the accusers—Mayella and her father, Bob Ewell, the town drunk —are lying.

It also becomes clear that the friendless Mayella made sexual advances toward Tom, and that her father caught her and beat her.

Despite significant evidence of Tom's innocence, the jury convicts him. Jem's faith in justice becomes badly shaken, as is Atticus', when the hapless Tom is shot and killed while trying to escape from prison. Despite Tom's conviction, Bob Ewell is humiliated by the events of the trial, Atticus explaining that he "destroyed [Ewell's] last shred of credibility at that trial.

Finally, he attacks the defenseless Jem and Scout while they walk home on a dark night after the school Halloween pageant. Jem suffers a broken arm in the struggle, but amid the confusion someone comes to the children's rescue. The mysterious man carries Jem home, where Scout realizes that he is Boo Radley.

Sheriff Tate arrives and discovers that Bob Ewell has died during the fight. The sheriff argues with Atticus about the prudence and ethics of charging Jem whom Atticus believes to be responsible or Boo whom Tate believes to be responsible. Atticus eventually accepts the sheriff's story that Ewell simply fell on his own knife. Boo asks Scout to walk him home, and after she says goodbye to him at his front door he disappears again.

While standing on the Radley porch, Scout imagines life from Boo's perspective, and regrets that they had never repaid him for the gifts he had given them.

To Kill a Mockingbird - What does Scout refer to her father as Atticus? Showing of 73

Scout then goes back home to Atticus and stays up with him for a while in Jem's room. Soon Atticus takes her to bed and tucks her in, before leaving to go back to Jem. Autobiographical elements Lee has said that To Kill a Mockingbird is not an autobiographybut rather an example of how an author "should write about what he knows and write truthfully".

explain the relationship between atticus and scout

Lee's father, Amasa Coleman Lee, was an attorney, similar to Atticus Finch, and inhe defended two black men accused of murder.

After they were convicted, hanged and mutilated, [14] he never tried another criminal case. Lee's father was also the editor and publisher of the Monroeville newspaper. Although more of a proponent of racial segregation than Atticus, he gradually became more liberal in his later years.

Lee's mother was prone to a nervous condition that rendered her mentally and emotionally absent. Lee modeled the character of Dill on her childhood friend, Truman Capoteknown then as Truman Persons. Both Lee and Capote loved to read, and were atypical children in some ways: Lee was a scrappy tomboy who was quick to fight, and Capote was ridiculed for his advanced vocabulary and lisp.

She and Capote made up and acted out stories they wrote on an old Underwood typewriter that Lee's father gave them.

They became good friends when both felt alienated from their peers; Capote called the two of them "apart people".

explain the relationship between atticus and scout

He was hidden until virtually forgotten; he died in The story and the trial were covered by her father's newspaper which reported that Lett was convicted and sentenced to death. After a series of letters appeared claiming Lett had been falsely accused, his sentence was commuted to life in prison. He died there of tuberculosis in However, inLee stated that she had in mind something less sensational, although the Scottsboro case served "the same purpose" to display Southern prejudices.

Part of the beauty is that she Her art is visual, and with cinematographic fluidity and subtlety we see a scene melting into another scene without jolts of transition. After Dill promises to marry her, then spends too much time with Jem, Scout reasons the best way to get him to pay attention to her is to beat him up, which she does several times. Satire and irony are used to such an extent that Tavernier-Courbin suggests one interpretation for the book's title: Lee is doing the mocking—of education, the justice system, and her own society—by using them as subjects of her humorous disapproval.

This prompts their black housekeeper Calpurnia to escort Scout and Jem to her church, which allows the children a glimpse into her personal life, as well as Tom Robinson's. She is so distracted and embarrassed that she prefers to go home in her ham costume, which saves her life. The grotesque and near-supernatural qualities of Boo Radley and his house, and the element of racial injustice involving Tom Robinson, contribute to the aura of the Gothic in the novel.

Furthermore, in addressing themes such as alcoholism, incestrape, and racial violence, Lee wrote about her small town realistically rather than melodramatically. She portrays the problems of individual characters as universal underlying issues in every society. Lee seems to examine Jem's sense of loss about how his neighbors have disappointed him more than Scout's. Jem says to their neighbor Miss Maudie the day after the trial, "It's like bein' a caterpillar wrapped in a cocoon I always thought Maycomb folks were the best folks in the world, least that's what they seemed like".

As a character, Atticus is even-handed throughout the story. He is one of the very few characters who never has to rethink his position on an issue.

  • In to kill a mockingbird what are relationship traits between atticus and scout?

He uses all these instances as an opportunity to pass his values on to Scout and Jem. Scout says that "'Do you really think so? Atticus uses this approach not only with his children, but with all of Maycomb. And yet, for all of his mature treatment of Jem and Scout, he patiently recognizes that they are children and that they will make childish mistakes and assumptions. Ironically, Atticus' one insecurity seems to be in the child-rearing department, and he often defends his ideas about raising children to those more experienced and more traditional.

His stern but fair attitude toward Jem and Scout reaches into the courtroom as well. He politely proves that Bob Ewell is a liar; he respectfully questions Mayella about her role in Tom's crisis.

One of the things that his longtime friend Miss Maudie admires about him is that "'Atticus Finch is the same in his house as he is on the public streets.

And although most of the town readily pins the label "trash" on other people, Atticus reserves that distinction for those people who unfairly exploit others. Atticus believes in justice and the justice system. He doesn't like criminal law, yet he accepts the appointment to Tom Robinson's case.