Brabantios relationship with desdemona

Brabantio and Desdemona - The Patriarchy in Othello

Notably the relationships between Brabantio and Desdemona, the relationship between Roderigo and Desdemona, the relationship between Cassio and. In the play Othello, by William Shakespeare, Brabantio and Desdemona have a father-daughter relationship, even though it is not seen a lot in this play, It is a. The father-daughter relationship that exists between Brabantio and Desdemona is hardly out of the ordinary. Brabantio is a typical.

Get Access Explain the way relationships effect the outcokme of the play Othello by William Shakespear Othello In the play Othello by Shakespeare there are numerous various male and female roles, that between husband and wife, mater and servant relationships as well as the relationship between men and women in the set society which is patriarchally based. Notably the relationships between Brabantio and Desdemona, the relationship between Roderigo and Desdemona, the relationship between Cassio and Desdemona, the relationship between Iago and Emila and finally as well as ultimately the relationship between Desdemona and Othello.

These four associations impact in both a small and large way to the ending of this play, the death of Desdemona, Emila and Othello. One of the first relationships seen during the play Othello is that which runs between Desdemona and Brabantio of a father to his daughter. As was the attitude of the time Brabantio considered Desdemona as a procession and a prize rather then a person.

This stemmed from the patriarchal society of the time. Look to your house, your daughter and your bags! In William Shakespeare's ''Othello'', the relationship between Othello and Desdemona changes rapidly. In this lesson, we take a look at how this relationships evolves throughout the play. Desdemona and Othello Well, that escalated quickly.

This is probably the most accurate way to describe Desdemona and Othello's relationship in William Shakespeare's Othello. First of all, since the relationship involved two people from different racial backgrounds, the story explores and challenges racial perceptions.

Brabantio and Desdemona - Shabir's English Summative

The relationship itself also changes throughout the play as Othello transitions from a loving husband to a murderous madman. Two men, Iago and Roderigo, are discussing how upset they are by the fact that Othello and Desdemona are married. In the same spirit Imogen refused the coarse and villainous Cloten, to join hands and hearts with the virtuous Posthumus.

The lovely Jewess, Jessica, ran away from the miserly Shylock to marry the Christian, Lorenzo, and at the same time accepted the religion of her husband. In all these cases the maidens found their true life with the men of their own choice, and the dramatist gives his verdict in making their love happy and successful, and in bringing out of their marriage a larger good to all.

There are in these and other instances, however, many differences from the case of Othello and Desdemona. It is not so much the wilful disrespect to her father that is the fault of Desdemona, though some critics make a great deal of this, but the fact that in marrying Othello she showed a wilful disregard of her own highest interests. It can scarcely be maintained that the marriage of Othello and Desdemona was a complete spiritual union, for there were too many diverse elements that at the time seemed incompatible and in the end proved entirely irreconcilable.

It is true, of course, that as in the case of Juliet the passion of love transformed Desdemona from a meek and blushing maiden into a strong and self-reliant woman.

There need be no attempt to deny the reality of the love of these two, and its effect upon their development, but it was not strong enough or natural enough to overcome all its enemies, as a true and natural love like that of Romeo and Juliet can do. Under some conditions it is possible that their love might have outlived their lives and overcome its handicaps, yet it is to miss the art of this drama not to see that the dramatist is here showing its unnaturalness by placing it in the conditions that test it to the uttermost and that reveal its weakness and bring it to defeat.

When Desdemona is brought into court to speak for herself in the matter of the marriage, she declares that she freely and lovingly takes Othello for her husband, and intimates that she is willing to take all the consequences of that act. She affirms her love for the Moor, and her desire to live with him, and requests to be permitted to accompany him to Cyprus.

She says she understands fully what she is doing, recognizes Othello as a Moor, but that she accepts him as he is, or, as her words imply, she finds compensation for his color in the quality of his mind, in his honors, and in his courage: Seeing her determination and her willingness to abide by her decision, her father accepts what seems inevitable, but leaves them with the needless and cruel mark: She has deceiv'd her father, and may thee.

These words let us see where Desdemona got her wilfulness, and relieve us of the necessity of grieving much over the sorrows of her father in this most unfortunate marriage. In some recent criticism there has been an attempt to glorify the purity and beauty of the love of Othello and Desdemona, and to place it among the most spiritual of the loves of Shakespeare.

Professor Bradley speaks of Desdemona's choice of Othello as rising "too far above our common level," and adds: If Goethe's suggestions for the re-casting of Hamlet in order to express better the meaning have not helped but hindered the understanding of Shakespeare's drama, we should learn the lesson of letting the dramatist have his way.

Some of the critics before Professor Bradley have more truly seen the character of the love of Othello and Desdemona.

Othello & Desdemona's Relationship

Professor Dowden has observed that "In the love of each there was a romantic element; and romance is not the highest form of the service which imagination renders to love. For romance disguises certain facts, or sees them, as it were, through a luminous mist. But, between Othello and Desdemona, on the other hand, a most distressing conflict arose that almost completely overshadowed the original conflict and ended only in the greatest catastrophe of the drama.

Instead of bearing a comparison, the loves of the two plays are in almost every way a contrast. The marriage of Othello and Desdemona was a union of different races and colors that the sense of the world has never approved. The marriage of black and white seems always to have been repulsive to an Elizabethan, and dramatists before Shakespeare had always presumed that to be the case. Shakespeare no doubt shared this feeling, for in the two plays where no doubts on the matter are possible he follows the usual tradition.

Assuming he had a part in writing the play, he has made Aaron, the Moor of Titus Andronicus, not only repulsive but a veritable brute and as cruel as Marlowe's Barabas. And in The Merchant of Venice, about whose authorship there can be no doubt, and which is earlier than Othello, he had previously portrayed a Moor as a suitor for the hand of Portia, and presented him as unsuccessful.

When the Prince of Morocco chooses the golden casket, only to find "a carrion death" awaiting him, Portia remarks: Let all of his complexion choose me so.