The 100 clarke and lexa meet millers

The Clarke will eventually move on from Lexa | y3y3games.info

In Long Into an Abyss, the pair first meet when Clarke goes to Lexa's tent to make her an offer. When Lexa first sees Clarke she immediately recognizes her as. The 's Latest Castoff Mourns Slain Character: 'May We Meet Again' Alycia Debnam Carey, whose Commander Lexa died in Clarke's arms .. Miller is still canonly gay (though he doesn't get nearly enough screen time.). Why the Controversial Death on 'The ' Matters . Lexa and Clarke have sex in “13,” but then Lexa dies later. .. And next episode we have miller kissing with his boyfriend (I must have missed something, I could see they were friends but I .. But I did read that Clarke will meet Lexa again in the finale.

Both knew their relationship was never going to work on a long-term basis, which gave their brief time together extra sweetness and pathos. But it was always going to hurt, given these characters and the actors bringing them to life.

No Lexa in Season 3. No Heda in Polis or anywhere else would have meant no Clexa pain. Lexa is in Season 3, but she and Clarke never become intimate. Perhaps less heartbreak when Lexa dies. The chemistry between the actors is so potent and the relationship had been generally written so well that it would have been deeply frustrating had they never hooked up.

This is not a show that revolves around relationships, but this connection felt as though it was written in the stars.

Why the Controversial Death on ‘The 100’ Matters

Also, it would have been odd and sketchy for them not to act like normal, sexual adults. Lexa is in Season 3, but she and Clarke are intimate for some time before Lexa dies.

We get to see more of their happiness and even a touch of domesticity as their relationship develops. The more she loved Clarke, the more she was afraid that would lead her away from her primary goal, which is keeping her people alive. This is a reasonable and defensible desire, and this is where the compression of the season causes problems.

But it never sat right with me, never, in part because it was one of the worst-written episodes in the history of the show and this is a show that once featured a demonically possessed truck. A great character — who is also a lesbian — got a stupid death in a crappy, astoundingly tin-eared episode for no reason. Truly, there was no defensible reason, and it really bothered me in a number of ways. But I finished out the season, even though the show had done other really dumb stuff in the past do not start me on the pointless death of Rufus.

Various patterns had finally gotten to me, I realized the summer after Season 10 ended. There was no excuse for the show going down that road the way it did; it was simply lazy, bad writing. There were only so many examples of sexism, large and small, that I could be expected to take, and I found after Season 10 ended that I had reached my limit.

I was done, for the foreseeable future. I hear the show has tried to correct and change some elements that bothered me. But I will certainly never sit in judgment of anyone who feels that a development on a show fits into part of a larger pattern that is painful to not just them but a group they are part of. Part 1," Bellamy frees the Grounders inside Mount Weather, as Clarke's plan is to attack from within.

When the generators are taken out, soldiers from Mount Weather open fire on the army in front of their doors, but those still manage to destroy the lock at the last second. When they pull the door open, Lexa commands her people to stand down because of a deal she just cut with the Mountain Men. When the Grounders retreat, almost all of the Sky People accept defeat and soon retreat, leaving behind only a betrayed Clarke at the front door and Octavia in the tunnels.

Season 3[ edit ] In "Wanheda: Part Two," attackers on a jeep turn out to be Arkers who landed separately. Their numbers have dwindled to 63 due to conflict with the community called Ice Nation and they accept Kane's offer to come to Arkadia, where the other Sky People live. Part of the group continue to search for Clarke, who has been on the run for three months due to now being a legend and subsequent target because of her defeat of the Mountain Men after Lexa's betrayal.

This has earned her the nickname "Wanheda" commander of death. Indra, one of Lexa's best and most trusted warriors, warns Lexa that the Ice Nation is marching on her; Indra is there when bounty hunter Roan the banished Ice Nation prince brings Clarke to Lexa, who sought to capture Clarke before members of Ice Nation did. Still angry at Lexa for her betrayal, Clarke is dragged out kicking and screaming while vowing revenge on Lexa.

Lexa tells Clarke that she intends to initiate the Sky People into her coalition as the thirteenth clan. Clarke believes Lexa only wants this because her Clarke's defeat of the Mountain Men has made Lexa look weak. Lexa focuses on sparring with Aden, a Nightblood she has been training for the role of Commander. Nightbloods are Grounders with black blood; they are the only Grounders who can become commanders. As Titus Lexa's right-hand man and former mentor wants Lexa to kill Clarke because he feels that Clarke has weakened her reputation, Roan suggests that Clarke kill Lexa.

In the end, Clarke cannot do it and Lexa apologizes for her betrayal. Emerson, the last survivor of Mount Weather, is revealed to be alive.

What Could've Been (was What if) Chapter 6, a fanfic | FanFiction

In "Watch the Thrones," in a fight to the death for the right to the throne, Queen Nia chooses her son Roan to fight Lexa. She and Clarke later bond as Clarke tends to her wounds. In "Hakeldama," Clarke, Lexa, and other Grounders discover an army of fallen Grounders, slain by Pike the new and destructive leader of the Sky People and his followers.

Indra is found wounded and says Bellamy persuaded Pike to let her live in order to tell Lexa that the Sky People reject the newly-formed coalition. Lexa allows Clarke's return to Arkadia to tell Bellamy and the others to step down. Clarke fails to convince Bellamy, but convinces Lexa to end the cycle of violence in hopes of peace.

In "Bitter Harvest," Lexa worries that by trying to make peace instead of engaging in war, she is betraying the commanders who came before her. Clarke assures her that her legacy will be peace. Roan has Emerson, the last Mountain Man, delivered to Clarke; she must decide his fate. She ultimately decides to let Lexa banish him.

Octavia and a man named Semet walk in claiming the Sky People destroyed their village. Discussing the situation, Titus wants Lexa to destroy the thirteenth clan while Clarke thinks they just need time to take out Pike from the inside.

Speaking to everyone, Lexa orders the armies not to attack, but instead make a perimeter around Arkadia and says that any Sky Person found past the five mile buffer will be killed. Semet is angry at this and attempts to kill Lexa, but is stopped by Titus who kills him.

Later, Titus is against Clarke staying, believing she further endangers Lexa's life. He warns Lexa that, just like with Costia, she may not be able to separate feelings from duty. Lexa is enraged at this, reminding him that because she let Ice Nation into her coalition even after they cut off Costia's head and sent it to her bed, she is more than capable of separating feelings from duty. Later, Clarke goes into Lexa's room and realizes she is saying goodbye. Clarke says the reason she is going back is because the Sky People are her people.

Lexa says that this devotion is what makes Clarke the person she is. Clarke suggests that maybe someday they will owe nothing more to their people, and Lexa responds with "May we meet again. Afterward, Clarke admires Lexa's tattoos, pointing out there are only seven circles on her back despite there being nine participants.

Lexa tells her she got the one on her back on her Ascension Day, and asks to talk about something else. Clarke agrees and they become intimate again. It is later, as Lexa is running into Clarke's room, that Lexa is accidentally shot by Titus, who intended to kill Clarke.

Clarke catches Lexa as she falls and they take her to the bed. Lexa realizes she is going to die and tells Clarke not to be afraid. She tells Titus to never harm Clarke again, and he swears he will not. She tells him serve the next commander as he served her. Clarke continues to try and save Lexa, but she tells Clarke that her spirit will find a new commander. She says her fight is over and that Clarke was right that life should be about more than just surviving.

Clarke recites the Traveler's Blessing, an Arkadian prayer. As Lexa dies, Clarke kisses her one last time. Titus extracts a tech from Lexa's neck, where her tattoo is.

The tech is called "the flame," and it is revealed to be Lexa's spirit. She was augmented to carry an AI the flame.

The flame is how every new commander is chosen, with each new commander becoming a part of the flame. It is only compatible with Nightbloods.

Aden is meant to succeed Lexa, but, in "Stealing Fire," he is murdered by Ontari, a rogue Nightblood who seeks the throne for herself. ALIE is the one responsible for launching a nuclear strike on Earth because she believed it was needed to save humanity from extinction. This is in contrast to what her creator, Becca, had wanted. With Jaha's help, ALIE has been successful in getting many of the Sky People to swallow a chip that takes away pain emotional or physical and simulates a utopia called "the City of Light.

ALIE uses this chip to entice and control people. Clarke had tried to get Luna, a missing Nightblood and rightful heir to the Commander throne as indicated by the tattoos on Lexa's backto accept the flame, but she refused. Clarke is implanted with the flame with the help of a blood transfusion via a brain-dead Ontari, whose blood is compatible with the flame. Before Lexa sacrifices herself to get Clarke to safety, Clarke tells her that she loves her.

Lexa says that her spirit will always be with Clarke. Development[ edit ] Casting and creation[ edit ] Show creator Jason Rothenberg said he and others involved with the series were aware of Debnam-Carey while casting Clarke in ; although the chance for her to portray Clarke never materialized, her name was brought up while casting Lexa.

He called the casting a "no-brainer"; she did not audition for the role, but was rather offered it. That's kind of what happened in this case," stated Rothenberg, who considered Debnam-Carey's performance on The "amazing". He added, "You know we can't compete on some level with the cache of a franchise like that, with the numbers. No weapons, no power! I was like, 'I don't know what I'm doing! And that's what's so lucky about this show. It never started with expectation, so we've been able to embrace it and really make it our own, and that's been wonderful.

Lexa on her throne in war paint and Grounder attire; captures showcasing the wardrobe from different angles. Rothenberg said he and his crew do some research with regard to depicting societies, such as the Grounders, within the series, but most of what is shown is based on his personal tastes. He enjoys the world-building aspect the most. So yes, we do some research as to how societies have evolved in the past but for the most part it's fiction. Each costume tells the story of the world, of the people, of the specific character.

But the costumes are far from uniform. The people who lived on the ark, the people who live in the forest, the people who live in a frozen tundra, they all dress differently.

Costumes make a show's world real. It's funny, we did a whole day of tests with that makeup. We were like, 'Should we do this? Should we do tears? Should we do the bindi? The moment, I think I'm remembering it now, the moment was in Episode 9 when Lexa tells Clarke the story of Costia at the fire after the funeral, and she talks about Costia—that was the first reference, I think, to her sexuality," stated Rothenberg.

He "embraced it and [ran] with it. A director advised her that less is more, and she adapted to the character, and learned more about her, via portrayal. Someone was like, 'Is it a thing you've chosen to do, to not blink all the time?

Lexa's first appearance 2x06

There's a presence about her and a knowingness, and she's always observant. Debnam-Carey said "it's in [Lexa's] blood" to put her people first because they "are so close to her, that's what she's been groomed to be. She comes from a really harsh culture and she has huge responsibilities. It's all she's ever known. She was placed in a position where suddenly she was forced to make a lot of hard choices that most people never have to make, no matter what their age is.

The is a world where you don't ever really get to be a kid. They have to lead a huge amount of people. They have a lot of expectations riding on them. Sacrifices the characters make are "for a much greater goal in the end". They have also "taken characteristics from each other," with Lexa becoming more trusting and learning that love can be empowering, and Clarke becoming more ruthless. Thinking she could keep her alliance together, the 12 clans, because they would still have this evil empire out there to unite them," he stated.